SIMODIS® insecticide makes an ideal rotation partner for the management of thrips

31.08.2022

Thrips are problematic sucking insect pests to fruiting vegetable crops like capsicums, eggplants, and tomatoes. Direct feeding and egg laying can damage the fruit and some thrips species can vector tospoviruses like tomato spotted wilt virus. The key to effective management is a thorough monitoring program, while carefully rotating the available chemistry to manage resistance.


Pictured: Western flower thrips adult and nymph.

Registered management tools for thrips in fruiting vegetable crops are relatively limited. Growers can select products like Movento* (Group 23) or Success* Neo (Group 5) for the control of western flower thrips (WFT). Alternatively, products like Benevia* (Group 28) and MINECTO® Forte insecticide (Groups 28, 12A) are registered for the suppression of certain thrips species. When registered, SIMODIS® insecticide (Group 30), will give growers a viable alternative, providing an invaluable tool for the management of thrips especially where there is evidence of resistance to existing modes of action.

At Freemans Reach, NSW (2020), two applications of SIMODIS® insecticide (plus AGRAL® spray adjuvant) were compared against other industry standards for the control of WFT, on an eggplant crop. Insecticide treatments were applied 12 days apart at the beginning of fruit development (BBCH 71). The number of WFT (nymphs and adults) per 10 flowers were assessed 3 days after application A (3 DAA) and 7 days after application B (7 DAB).


Mean number of western flower thrips (nymphs and adults) per 10 eggplant flowers following two insecticide applications applied 12 days apart at the beginning of fruit development (BBCH 71). Numbers were assessed 3 days after application A (3 DAA) and 7 days after application B (7 DAB). Freemans Reach, New South Wales (2020). Means followed by the same letter at the same assessment date are not significantly different. Trial Number: N0751-2018.

The SIMODIS® insecticide treatment provided significant knockdown control of WFT on sampled flowers three days after application A. Success* Neo was the least effective knockdown treatment. The reduction in WFT numbers in the untreated control at the second assessment could be attributed to the environmental conditions. Continual rain and lower than normal temperatures had an adverse effect on the thrips population.

Given that thrips are rarely the only insect pest in the paddock, growers will likely select an insecticide that will also effectively manage the other pests. MINECTO® Forte insecticide tackles multiple pests, in addition to the suppression of thrips. It is also registered for the control of a range of caterpillars, aphids, mites, and whiteflies. 

The number of times an insecticide can be used each season is limited. For MINECTO® Forte, a maximum of two applications are permitted per crop and there must be 28 days between sprays. SIMODIS® insecticide (Group 30) is an ideal rotation tool for MINECTO® Forte insecticide. 

The Freemans Reach case study is a snapshot of what Syngenta has observed at numerous sites. SIMODIS® insecticide has consistently delivered reliable, robust efficacy and exceptional crop safety as part of an extensive Australian R&D trial program.

We will be showcasing SIMODIS® insecticide in field at our Syngenta GrowMore event in November. Talk to your local Syngenta representative to join us and experience this ground-breaking new product first-hand.

SIMODIS® insecticide redefines diamondback moth control

29.07.2022

Diamondback moth (DBM) is a destructive pest of brassica crops and over reliance on insecticides as a control measure has resulted in resistance to key insecticides. Most damage is caused by the caterpillars tunnelling into the heads of plants such as cabbage and brussels sprouts, and they can contaminate produce by pupating inside broccoli florets and cauliflower curds.

As a Group 30 mode of action, SIMODIS® insecticide will allow brassica growers to regain control of resistant DBM populations.

With DBM, monitoring is the key to effective management. For best results, SIMODIS® insecticide should be applied as soon as local thresholds are reached, either at egg hatch or very soon after egg hatch to target young larvae. Growers should avoid applying SIMODIS® insecticide to established populations dominated by large, late instar larvae.

In Gatton Queensland (2018), on a cauliflower crop, a single application of SIMODIS® insecticide (plus AGRAL® spray adjuvant) was compared against other industry standards for the control of DBM.


Pictured: Jo Gentle, Syngenta Field Biologist
The cauliflower on the left was untreated and has extensive DBM damage, whereas the cauliflower on the right was protected with a single application of SIMODIS® insecticide.

 

Insecticide treatments were applied 7 weeks after transplanting, at which point the harvestable cauliflower was at 60% head diameter (BBCH 46). The number of DBM larvae and pupae per plant were assessed 7, 14 and 20 days after application (DAA).


Mean number of DBM larvae and pupae per cauliflower plant following a single insecticide application when the harvestable cauliflower was at 60% head diameter (BBCH 46). Numbers were assessed 7, 14 and 20 days after application (DAA). Gatton, Queensland (2018). Means followed by the same letter at the same assessment date are not significantly different. Trial Number: JG031-2018.

One week after the application (7 DAA), all evaluated insecticides effectively controlled the DBM population. Two weeks (14 DAA) after the application, SIMODIS® insecticide offered significantly better control than the commercial standards Success* Neo (Group 5), Coragen* (Group 28) and PROCLAIM® Opti insecticide (Group 6). Applied late in the crop (BBCH 46), when the vegetative growth had slowed, the residual activity of SIMODIS® insecticide was evident. Three weeks after the application date (20 DAA), larvae and pupae numbers increased nearly threefold in the untreated control suggesting a recent egg lay had occurred. Despite this, the SIMODIS® insecticide application continued to control the DBM population.

This is not a one-off result, SIMODIS® insecticide has consistently delivered reliable robust efficacy and exceptional crop safety as part of an extensive Australian R&D trial program.

SIMODIS® insecticide is effective on all mite life stages

28.06.2022

As an insecticide, SIMODIS® powered by PLINAZOLIN® technology will make an exceptional miticide. In this technical update, we reveal how to use SIMODIS® insecticide commercially to control mites.

Mite pest

 

With mites, monitoring is the key to effective management. For best results, SIMODIS® insecticide should be applied as soon as local thresholds are reached, targeting the population before it becomes established.

SIMODIS® is a Group 30 insecticide and for mites up to two applications will be permitted per crop. To manage resistance, sequential applications will NOT be allowed. If retreatment is required, growers will need to use a miticide from a different mode of action group before applying SIMODIS® insecticide again.

In Bowen Queensland (2019), on a cucumber crop (cv. Gremlin), a single application of SIMODIS® insecticide (plus AGRAL® spray adjuvant) was compared against other industry standards. Insecticide treatments were applied 5 weeks after transplanting. Motile two-spotted mites were assessed on 20 mm leaf disks, 7, 14 and 22 days after application (DAA).


Mean number of motile two-spotted mites (TSM) per cucumber leaf disk (20 mm) following a single insecticide application, numbers were assessed 7, 14 and 22 DAA. SIMODIS® insecticide was applied with AGRAL® spray adjuvant at 10 mL/100 L. Bowen Qld (2019). Means followed by the same letter at the same assessment time are not significantly different. Trial Number QD002-2018.

In the untreated control, the two-spotted mite population continued to increase throughout the trial with more than 60 motiles per 20 mm leaf disk recorded 22 days after the trial was initiated. SIMODIS® insecticide showed very good efficacy in reducing the density of all mite stages (eggs, nymphs and adults) to very low levels. At the maximum proposed label rate, SIMODIS® insecticide had strong residual activity out to 22 days after application. As a contact insecticide, the residual activity will be influenced by the crop growth stage and spray coverage.

This is not a one-off result, SIMODIS® insecticide has consistently delivered reliable robust efficacy and exceptional crop safety as part of an extensive Australian R&D trial program.

SIMODIS® insecticide is so much more than a miticide, it will also be an invaluable management tool for Lepidopteran pests and a range of thrips species.

SIMODIS® insecticide will be registered for use in multiple vegetable crop groups 

31.05.22

In our last update, mites, thrips and caterpillars (Lepidoptera) were identified as the insect pests that SIMODIS® insecticide will have activity on. Powered by PLINAZOLIN® technology with its novel Mode of Action (Group 30), SIMODIS® insecticide will be an invaluable new tool for growers, particularly where insect pest populations have become more difficult to control due to resistance. 

Today we are revealing the crops that SIMODIS® insecticide will be registered in; they are brassicas (including brassica leafy vegetables), cucurbits, fruiting vegetables and bulb vegetables.

For a complete list of crops in each of these crop groups, click on each of the images below.

SIMODIS® insecticide will have activity on a range of hard to manage insect pests

02.05.2022

In our last SIMODIS® insecticide update we introduced the science behind the chemistry of SIMODIS® with an animated video explaining how the active ingredient works at a cellular level and how it is a brand-new Mode of Action insecticide (Group 30) for Australian horticulture.

Today we are revealing the insect pests that SIMODIS® insecticide will have activity on; Lepidoptera caterpillars, mites and thrips. 
 

 


 

These pests are traditionally hard-to-manage, not only because some of the available registered options are not performing as well as they used to, but also because of their rapid lifecycle and their preference for hidden locations within the crop.

Ahead of registration we are putting SIMODIS® insecticide through its paces, applying the product through commercial application equipment on a range of crops across the country.

We recently teamed up with Stuart Grigg (Stuart Grigg Ag-Hort Consulting P/L) to evaluate SIMODIS® insecticide for the control of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) in a crop of broccoli at Fresh Select Farms (Werribee South, Victoria). SIMODIS® insecticide was applied at buttoning, a couple weeks prior to harvest. A single application protected the crop, preventing larvae from pupating under the cap and impacting harvest quality.

 


Photo: SIMODIS® insecticide commercial demonstration at Fresh Select, Werribee South, Vic (2022).
Left to Right: Shane Sutherland (Farm Manager, Fresh Select Farms), Lisa Dillon (Syngenta) and Stuart Grigg (Stuart Grigg Ag-Hort Consulting).

Nationally, diamondback moth has become increasingly difficult to manage, with resistance having a negative impact on the efficacy of some well-known chemistry. Fortunately, the Australian horticultural industry is at a pivotal point; with SIMODIS® we will have a highly efficacious insecticide. It is however, so much more than that; powered by PLINAZOLIN® Technology, we will have a new mode of action insecticide that will give us the ability to regain the upper hand when it comes to protection.

A contact insecticide with a new MOA that paralyses treated insect pests

23.03.2022

In this update, we’ll introduce you to the molecule and its mode of action to explain how SIMODIS® Insecticide controls hard to manage insect pests at a cellular level.

Click on the link below to view a short animated video.

Note: The video refers to PLINAZOLIN® technology which is the trademark of the active ingredient in SIMODIS® Insecticide. This video also uses a stink bug to illustrate how the active ingredient is absorbed, it should be noted that SIMODIS® PLINAZOLIN® technology will NOT be registered for the control stink bugs in Australia.


Take home messages:

  • SIMODIS® Insecticide with PLINAZOLIN® technology is a novel, new Mode of Action insecticide (Group 30).
  • SIMODIS® Insecticide targets the insects’ nervous system preventing inhibitory signals (GABA) from being released within the synapse*. This prevents the insects’ muscles from relaxing, which effectively paralyses the pest preventing any further crop damage.
  • As a contact insecticide, the active ingredient is absorbed through the feet or it is ingested while the insect is cleaning and feeding.


* A synapse is a small gap at the end of a neuron that allows a signal to pass from one neuron to the next.

A historical moment for the crop protection industry

25.02.2022

Syngenta Australia has an application with the APVMA for the registration of SIMODIS® Insecticide based on PLINAZOLIN® technology. SIMODIS® will deliver a new mode of action insecticide (Group 30), with a registration expected in brassicas, bulb vegetables, cucurbits and fruiting vegetables.

To date we have seen a new blockbuster chemical class launched every 15 to 20 years. PLINAZOLIN® technology is the next big thing that will shape the market for the decades to come.

1950      Organophosphates & carbamates

1970      Pyrethroids

1990      Neonicotinoids

2006      Diamides

2021      PLINAZOLIN® technology

We have developed a series of monthly updates to bring you on the SIMODIS® insecticide launch journey. Updates will include details on the active ingredient, its mode of action, how the product works, the pests controlled as well as behind the scenes look at some commercial trial results, so you know how and when to apply SIMODIS® Insecticide before it is released commercially.

We look forward to sharing this exciting journey with you.

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